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Addiction to Hydrocodone FAQ

Addiction to Hydrocodone FAQ: 6 Common Questions

Addiction to hydrocodone is a common occurrence these days. America is in the throes of an opioid epidemic. People are prescribed opioids for chronic pain and for post-operative pain. Even if an individual takes the prescribed doses, they are at risk of becoming addicted.

The prescribed dose is taken, a dependence forms, thus leading a person to have a compulsive need to source hydrocodone – regardless of the consequences. If you are suffering from the effects of addiction to hydrocodone, call Chesapeake Drug Treatment Centers at 757-447-9507 to review your treatment options.

Addiction to Hydrocodone FAQ

  1. What are the signs of hydrocodone abuse? Hydrocodone is marketed as Norco, Vicodin, and Lortab. They are all powerful painkillers. Even if one were to use them infrequently they are at risk of developing a dependence on the drug. Signs of hydrocodone abuse include:
  • Withdrawal from social activities
  • Drowsiness
  • Rash
  • Small pupils
  • Shallow or slowed breathing
  1. What are the dangers of taking hydrocodone? Morphine and heroin are in the same category of drugs as hydrocodone. These drugs all interact with the same parts of the brain. They attach to the brain's opioid receptors to reduce pain while creating a sense of euphoria.

In addition, this drug interacts with the reward system of the brain, which serves to reinforce the drug-seeking behavior. If one continues to use hydrocodone, they will experience short-term and long-term damage to their mental state and to their body.

The individuals who abuse Norco and Vicodin are seeking the euphoric high produced by said drugs as a way to numb their pain – either physical or psychological.

  1. What are the side effects of hydrocodone abuse? Some people experience negative effects immediately after dosing themselves. The severity of symptoms range from annoying to deadly. Even if you consume this drug in the prescribed amounts, you may experience these side effects. They include:
  • Blurry vision
  • Seizures
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Angry feelings
  • Dry mouth
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Confusion
  • Slow heartbeat
  • Difficulty concentrating

If you are still curious about, "what are the side effects of hydrocodone," call Chesapeake Drug Treatment Centers.

  1. Is hydrocodone addictive? Even if taken in the doses prescribed, one can become chemically dependent to the substance. Dependence leads to addiction.
  2. What are the long-term side effects of hydrocodone abuse? Irreversible consequences result when one abuses hydrocodone over a long period of time. The brain's reward system is disrupted from its normal function when hydrocodone is abused, thus, making it difficult for one to find pleasure in healthy activities.

Many of the hydrocodone products that are available contain acetaminophen (Tylenol), which can cause serious damage to the liver if taken for an extended length of time. The primary concern and health risk associated with long-term hydrocodone abuse is liver damage.

The FDA has even stipulated that no more than 325mg of acetaminophen may be used in drugs that are hydrocodone-based. At one time, the common amount of acetaminophen contained in hydrocodone drugs was double this amount. Long term side effects include:

  • Death
  • Coma
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Liver damage
  • Mood swings
  • Psychosis
  • Hallucinations
  • Jaundice

Is hydrocodone addictive? If you are still wondering, call Chesapeake Drug Treatment Centers. The staff there can help you locate a treatment facility.

  1. What do I do if someone I care about has a hydrocodone addiction? The best thing to do in this situation is try to stage an intervention before it is too late.

If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction to hydrocodone, please contact Chesapeake Drug Treatment Centers at 757-447-9507 to review your treatment options and locate a treatment facility that will provide the best chance for your lifelong sobriety.

 

 

Sources:

https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids

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